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Public Domain Aeronautical Software (PDAS)  

This is an experimental program in the initial phases of testing. I hope to learn how to define VRML world objects and eventually couple this to some of the aerodynamic programs to display streamlines and surface pressures, and maybe more. You are invited to have a good look and perhaps make some comments that will aid me in the development. It produces a file in VRML 1.0 format.

The origin of this program came from several user requests that I offer a version of a program called FAST, developed at NASA Ames, which in turn was an outgrowth of a program called PLOT3D. The idea is to display the data (input and output) from a general class of CFD programs.

Further investigation indicated that there was a large quantity of code specific to the Silicon Graphics workstation; I do not want to start supporting programs that required expensive workstations! Actually, the OpenGL part of the program is becoming available on the PC platform, so the project might be feasible.

However, there is an alternate approach that seemed more intriguing, namely capitializing on the VRML (Virtual Reality Modelling Language) work being done by many people. It seems to me all I have to do is write a file in the approved VRML format, and all those smart people at Silicon Graphics and Platinum and Microsoft will take care of everything concerning viewing angles, lighting, navigation in 3D, colors, etc.

So, what you have on the CD-ROM is the first effort. The program asks for the name of the input file. This must be a file in LaWGS format. After reading the input data, the program produces a file called wgs.wrl that may be used as input to a VRML browser. I am experimenting with the Microsoft VRML plug-in for Internet Explorer 5 and with the Cosmo Viewer 2.1. I am far from an expert but I am having fun. If you want to try some of this, go ahead. I will put more information on the web site as the work develops.

The first thing I will work on is coupling the output from PanAir to this program so that we can encode the surface pressures as color and visualize the streamlines and flow field properties. I would be glad to hear what you think of this and appreciate any tips you might offer.

Keep in touch!

PDAS home > Contents > VRML
Public Domain Aeronautical Software (PDAS)